Departmental Pages

PiXL

Partners in Excellence

This is a programme in which the school shares best practice with others throughout the country, helping to raise standards and, vitally, giving students a better future and brighter hope. The programme has three pillars – Currency, Character, and Culture – that combine to provide a Pathway to Success.
Currency refers to the qualifications that our students receive that enables them to be successful in later life and access the pathways available to them. However, in a changing world academic success is only part of what it means to be successful and through our new
and exciting Character and Culture curriculum we provide an opportunity for students to develop skills and qualities that will give our students ‘The Edge’. As Martin Luther King says "Intelligence plus character—that is the goal of true education."
A carefully crafted learning journey has been created that sees students go on a journey of self-discovery and growth from day one of year 7. During this journey, students will develop key skills in leadership, organisation, resilience, initiative and communication referred to as
LORIC. These key attributes will be accredited through the PiXL edge award as students involve themselves in the wider life of the school and beyond.
In addition, students will explore key life areas in terms of personal, social and health education. As a Catholic school, our students will have the opportunity to explore the value of altruism as shown through the values of Christ in the Gospels. They will explore their role in society and understand the importance of E-safety and personal health both in terms of physical and mental wellbeing. 

Design & Technology

Design & Technology

All pupils and students at Hagley Catholic High School follow a taught course of Design and Technology. We focus on designing and prototyping but also cover areas relevant to Mathematics, English and Science. We operate a carousel system in KS3 and deliver projects related to the use of papers and boards, metals, woods, plastics, CAD/CAM and electronics/systems and control. Our aim is to prepare students for the wider world, to help them go on to make well informed choices as they go on to shape the future. We hope that students will choose to study a GCSE in Design and Technology but certainly we aim to show them how the theory they learn with us, and in their other subjects, can be put to a wider practical use. The Department is staffed by two specialist teachers, supported by an experienced technician:

  • Mr. M Button - Subject Leader of Design and Technology
    • Email – This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
  • Mr. D. Goddard - Teacher of Design and Technology
    • Email – This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
  • Mr. R Caulwell - Design and Technology Technician
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KEY STAGE 3

In Key Stage 3 students move through a carousel system, which includes Food and Nutrition, where they will spend approximately 10 weeks in each subject area, developing a range of Design and Manufacturing knowledge and skills which will help prepare them for work and life. These skills build towards Key Stage 4 courses.

Year 7

Graphics Module

Systems & Control

Product Design Module

Basics of Typography

The Design Process

2D Sketching

Isometric Drawing

Making in paper and board

Safe use of cutting tools

Measuring out and marking

Introduction to soldering techniques

Components and their functions

Systems: Input-Process-Output

Computer Aided Design

Using CAD to simulate circuits

Jewellery project

Understanding different Metals

Designing in CAD

Health and Safety in a workshop

Using metal tools to make

Tools & their uses 

 

Year 8

Graphics Module

Systems & Control

Product Design Module

Past & Present designers

Communication skills

Isometric drawing

Teamworking

Research and Analysis

Making in Styrofoam

Night light project

Introduction to Strip boards

Bread boards

On-board components and their functions

Systems: Input-Process-Output

Using CAD to simulate circuits

Computer Aided Manufacturing (CAM)

Understanding different woods

Target markets

Understanding surface finishes

Understanding different adhesives

Using wood and wood working tools

Further machinery and equipment

Year 9

 Design & Technology Module

System & Control

Health & Social care module

Designing for a client and an end user

2 Point Perspective drawing                                                                

Mechanisms and Motion

Biomimetics

Smart and modern materials

Alarming designs project

Stripboards                                                                                     

Components & Control systems                                                      

Systems: Input-Process-Output

Research 

Using CAD to simulate circuits

Computer Aided Manufacturing (CAM)

Cambridge National Level 2 Course Intro

Early skills include an ability to recognise Physical, Intellectual,

Emotional and Social developments and put these into a time line

with appropriate age ranges. Also covering the Rights of

Individuals and care values and legislation.

Year 10

At KS4 you can choose to study GCSE Design & Technology. The course we offer is the Edexcel 1DTO specification. This course has two units; an exam and a N.E.A. project, each worth 50% of the marks for the course. The exam theory will tests students’ knowledge and understanding of all areas of Design and Technology; from a materials science understanding of woods, metals, polymers and fabrics, to environmental issues such as product life cycles and energy generation, storage and distribution. The Non-Examined Assessment, or design and make project, is based on a choice of tasks set by the exam board each year, this is introduced toward the end of Year 10. This is a two year course. Our current specialist materials area is papers and boards.

Year 11

In year 11 we focus on the Non Examined Assessment part of the course. Students have until Easter to research, analyse design, develop, plan, manufacture, and then test and evaluate a unique product. Students are expected to find and work with a client who will identify a specific need, which the student has to solve through the manufacture of a prototype product. This experience builds a wide variety of skills including: working to a deadline; working with a client or end user; communication and presentation skills and detailed manufacturing skills. Students are also expected to demonstrate how their knowledge and understanding of their specialist area has developed during the project. This work is internally marked and then externally moderated.

Assesment

  • During Key Stage 3, work is formatively assessed in an ongoing manner and then summatively assessed at the end of each module. The final mark for each module is recorded and it contributes to their overall mark at the end of the year. We include self and peer assessment against a grade ladder of written descriptors as a part of our approach to ensure pupils understand how to improve their work. This grade ladder helps students to develop their knowledge and skills to prepare them for our GCSE course.
  • During Key Stage 4 we use the N.E.A. mark scheme and sample and past exam papers to monitor practical and theoretical progress. We use the N.E.A. mark scheme throughout to measure progress with the N.E.A.

Extra Curricular

  • The department offers extra-curricular support to all students at lunchtimes and after school. We also run a Warhammer modelling and table top gaming club.

 

 

Science

Science

The department has a fantastic mix of experience, knowledge and dynamism, consisting of the following staff:
  • Mr. Patchett- Head of Department. Teacher of Physics across all Key Stages and teacher of Science at Key Stage 3
  • Mrs Granger - Assistant Head of Science with Key Stage 4 responsibilities. Teacher of Biology across all Key Stages and Teacher of Applied Science at A level, and Teacher of Science at Key Stage 3.
  • Mr Creevy- Assistant Head of Science with Key Stage 3 responsibilities. Teacher of Chemistry across all Key Stages, and Teacher of Science at Key Stage 3.
  • Mrs Lloyd- Teaching and Learning responsibilities within the Applied Science Department. Teacher of Applied Science/Biology at A level and Biology at KS4, and Science Teacher at Key Stage 3.
  • Mr Frobisher- Teacher of Chemistry across all Key Stages.
  • Miss Hegarty- Teacher of Biology across all Key Stages and Teacher of Science across Key Stage 3. Leadership responsibilities for Year 12.
  • Mrs Fairclough- Teacher of Chemistry across all Key Stages and Applied Science at A-level.  Teacher of Science at Key Stage 3.
  • Miss Higgins - Teacher of Chemistry and Physics across Key Stage 3 and 4. Teacher of Science at Key Stage 3.
  • Mrs Heywood - Teacher of Chemistry and Physics across Key Stage 3 and 4. Teacher of Science at Key Stage 3.
  • Mrs Anderson- Senior Lab Technician

 

Vision

In Science, the staff are passionate about their subject and committed (through delivering relevant, engaging and fun lessons) in their desire to instil a sense of interest and intrigue into all pupils. Through the experience of practicals and investigations students learn many different analytical skills that are invaluable, not only for academic success but also useful beyond the classroom.  Students are progressively introduced to these enquiry skills throughout their scientific journey from Year 7 through to GCSE and A level. Content is introduced gradually and systematically across the five years so that knowledge acquisition in any one Key Stage does not prove burdensome. By teaching small manageable chunks of the ten big themes every year students can build up a complete understanding of Science. The content increasing in cognitive and conceptual difficulty and students master each topic in turn before revisiting that theme the following year.

Year 7

Knowledge and skills gained in year 7

At the start of year 7 students are introduced to the exciting environment of a science lab. Early skills developed include an ability to identify hazards and understand risk. They are introduced to the principles of the scientific method whereby the students can pose testable predictions of observations, develop fair and accurate methods and analyse outcomes to evaluate the original prediction. These skills are delivered throughout the year by giving the students an understanding of the main themes of science:

  • Forces, Electromagnetism, Energy, Waves, Matter, Reactions, Earth, Organisms, Ecosystems, and Genes
  • Knowledge and skill development is assessed regularly throughout the year. Students carry out small reviews of their learning in most lessons so that a detailed picture of their progress can achieved. Larger End Of Topic Tests happen three times a year.

Year 8

Knowledge and skills gained in year 8

  • In Year 8 the themes are revisited in a spiral format with new content being added to the same main ideas (e.g. Gravity and the Universe is the new content in the Forces theme, electrical current in Electromagnetism, Energy Transfer in Energy, Light in Waves, Separating Mixtures in Matter, Acids and Alkali in Reactions, Movement in Organisms, Plant Reproduction in Ecosystems and Human Reproduction in Genes).
  • Some of the same skills polished in Year 7 are further developed in Year 8 (e.g. as students mature their awareness of Hazard and Risk becomes greater and these Risk Assessment skills become an integral part of planning experiments). As students’ literacy skills improve a greater emphasis is placed on the skills of Communicating Ideas and Constructing Explanations.

Year 9

Knowledge and skills gained in year 9

  • In Year 9 the themes are revisited in a spiral format with new content being added to the same main ideas (e.g. Pressure is the new content in the Forces theme, Magnetism in Electromagnetism, Heating and Cooling in Energy, Properties in Waves, Elements in Matter, Types in Reactions, Digestion in Organisms, Photosynthesis in Ecosystems and Inheritance and Evolution in Genes).
  • Some of the same skills polished in Year 8 are further developed in Year 9 (e.g. their ability to graphically analyse data is developed to a point where students can confidently predict mathematical patterns between dependent and independent variables). As students become more passionate and the world in which they live Critiquing Claims and Justifying Opinions are just two of the skills that develop more important.
  • Half way through Year 9 the students start their GCSE work, although they might not notice. The transition between KS3 and Ks4 should be seamless.

Year 10

Knowledge and skills gained in year 10

  • Students have chosen to study either the separate sciences (AQA specification code 8461, 2 and 3) or combined science (8464) in their GCSE options. Every student will take 2 GCSE exam papers in Biology, Chemistry and Physics. Paper 1 content is largely taught in Year 10 and Paper 2 delivered in Year 11.   As the curriculum spirals again, new content is delivered across the GCSE Program of Study, with an ever increasing level of demand and challenge.  The skills perfected in Year 7-9 are put to good use in the Required Practicals. These practicals are common to all schools across the country and their methods and outcomes are assessed in the exams.
  • The content covered in Biology in Paper 1 is Cell Biology, Organisation, Infection and Response, and Bioenergetics.
  • The content covered in Chemistry in Paper 1 is Atomic structure, Bonding, Quantitative Chemistry, Chemical Changes and Energy Changes.
  • The content covered in Physics in Paper 1 is Energy, Electricity, Matter and Atomic Physics.

Year 11

Knowledge and skills gained in year 11

  • The content that is assessed in Paper 2 of the GCSE exams is covered in Year 11.
  • The content covered in Biology in Paper 2 is Homeostasis and Response; Inheritance, variation and evolution; and Ecology.
  • How it’s The content covered in Chemistry in Paper 2 is Chemical Change, Organic chemistry, Chemical analysis, Chemistry of the Atmosphere and Using Resources.
  • The content covered in Physics in Paper 2 is Forces, Waves, Magnetism and electromagnetism, and (for Triple Award students) Space physics.

Assesment

  • Knowledge and skills are assessed with Interim formative assessments and End of subject tests in each topic.
  • Knowledge and skills are assessed with Interim formative assessments and End of subject tests in each topic.
  • The mock exams taken in the Autumn term are important in helping to determine the students’ tier of entry. Analysis of the mock is carried out to whether there are any weaknesses in Knowledge and Understanding or Application.

Extra-Curricular

Developing a students’ interest in science outside of the classroom is very important. The department always endeavours to run a STEM club after school and during science week the department runs extensive lunchtime activities that aim to create a sense of awe and wonder.

Sociology

Sociology

Department staff: teacher in charge of sociology: Mrs S Ravat, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Vision

The A level Sociology Program prepares one for a lifetime of change by developing one's appreciation of diversity, love of learning, writing and study skills, and knowledge base about human behaviour, social organization, culture, and social change. The study of sociology helps the individual to understand human society and how social systems work. Sociology is also important for individuals because it throws light on the problems of the individuals.

In our increasingly diverse world, the study of sociology gives the pupils the skills 21st century workers need: critical and analytical thinking, writing ability, cultural competence, and self-awareness. These are sequenced across year 12 and year 13. Pupils use the skills from KS4 subjects like English, History, Geography, Health and Social Care and learn to apply them to sociology.

The subject specific skills gained from Sociology the ability to describe and explain social and organisational systems and structures. In year 12 pupils study social structures of the Family and Education. In Year 13 pupils continue the theme of structures by learning about Beliefs in Society and Crime and Deviance.

 Sociology allows Solving Social Problems through investigations. Pupil learn research methods and show how social scientists implement them to investigate social issues. This allows the pupils to examine human society within larger social, political and economic contexts. One of the major benefits of being a sociologist is the chance to influence efforts to solve social problems by conducting research and using the evidence to influence policy.

Transferable skills

  • strong written and oral communication skills;
  • the ability to understand complex ideas and apply these to practical situations;
  • research and analytical skills, including the ability to conduct interviews, surveys, focus groups and interpret and challenge numerical data and statistics.

Year 12

Students must study the following two core themes:

  • socialisation, culture and identity
  • social differentiation, power and stratification.

The themes should be understood and applied to particular substantive areas of Sociology. These themes are to be interpreted broadly as threads running through many areas of social life and should not therefore be regarded as discrete topics.

In addition, students must understand the significance of conflict and consensus, social structure and social action, and the role of values.

The central focus of study in this specification should be on UK society today, with consideration given to comparative dimensions where relevant, including the siting of UK society within its globalised context.

Families and Households:

Students are expected to be familiar with sociological explanations of the following content:

  • the relationship of the family to the social structure and social change, with particular reference to the economy and to state policies
  • changing patterns of marriage, cohabitation, separation, divorce, childbearing and the life course, including the sociology of personal life, and the diversity of contemporary family and household structures
  • gender roles, domestic labour and power relationships within the family in contemporary society
  • the nature of childhood, and changes in the status of children in the family and society
  • demographic trends in the United Kingdom since 1900: birth rates, death rates, family size, life expectancy, ageing population, and migration and globalisation.

Education, Theory, and Methods:

Students are expected to be familiar with sociological explanations of the following content:

  • the role and functions of the education system, including its relationship to the economy and to class structure
  • differential educational achievement of social groups by social class, gender and ethnicity in contemporary society
  • relationships and processes within schools, with particular reference to teacher/pupil relationships, pupil identities and subcultures, the hidden curriculum, and the organisation of teaching and learning
  • the significance of educational policies, including policies of selection, marketisation and privatisation, and policies to achieve greater equality of opportunity or outcome, for an understanding of the structure, role, impact and experience of and access to education; the impact of globalisation on educational policy.

Theory and Methods

Students must examine the following areas:

  • quantitative and qualitative methods of research; research design
  • sources of data, including questionnaires, interviews, participant and non-participant observation, experiments, documents and official statistics
  • the distinction between primary and secondary data, and between quantitative and qualitative data
  • the relationship between positivism, interpretivism and sociological methods; the nature of ‘social facts’
  • the theoretical, practical and ethical considerations influencing choice of topic, choice of method(s) and the conduct of research
  • consensus, conflict, structural and social action theories
  • the concepts of modernity and post-modernity in relation to sociological theory
  • the nature of science and the extent to which Sociology can be regarded as scientific
  • the relationship between theory and methods
  • debates about subjectivity, objectivity and value freedom
  • the relationship between Sociology and social policy.

Year 13

Beliefs in Society

Students are expected to be familiar with sociological explanations of the following content:

  • ideology, science and religion, including both Christian and non-Christian religious traditions
  • the relationship between social change and social stability, and religious beliefs, practices and organisations
  • religious organisations, including cults, sects, denominations, churches and New Age movements, and their relationship to religious and spiritual belief and practice
  • the relationship between different social groups and religious/spiritual organisations and movements, beliefs and practices
  • the significance of religion and religiosity in the contemporary world, including the nature and extent of secularisation in a global context, and globalisation and the spread of religions.

Crime and Deviance:

Students are expected to be familiar with sociological explanations of the following content:

  • crime, deviance, social order and social control
  • the social distribution of crime and deviance by ethnicity, gender and social class, including recent patterns and trends in crime
  • globalisation and crime in contemporary society; the media and crime; green crime; human rights and state crimes
  • crime control, surveillance, prevention and punishment, victims, and the role of the criminal justice system and other agencies.

Theory and Methods

Students must examine the following areas:

  • quantitative and qualitative methods of research; research design
  • sources of data, including questionnaires, interviews, participant and non-participant observation, experiments, documents and official statistics
  • the distinction between primary and secondary data, and between quantitative and qualitative data
  • the relationship between positivism, interpretivism and sociological methods; the nature of ‘social facts’
  • the theoretical, practical and ethical considerations influencing choice of topic, choice of method(s) and the conduct of research
  • consensus, conflict, structural and social action theories
  • the concepts of modernity and post-modernity in relation to sociological theory
  • the nature of science and the extent to which Sociology can be regarded as scientific
  • the relationship between theory and methods
  • debates about subjectivity, objectivity and value freedom
  • the relationship between Sociology and social policy.

Assessment Tab

The subject specification has been designed with the clear objective of addressing the requirements above and will encourage students to:

  • acquire knowledge and a critical understanding of contemporary social processes and social changes
  • appreciate the significance of theoretical and conceptual issues in sociological debate
  • understand and evaluate sociological methodology and a range of research methods through active involvement in the research process
  • develop skills that enable individuals to focus on their personal identity, roles and responsibilities within society
  • develop a lifelong interest in social issues.

Asessment Objectives:

Assessment objectives (AOs) are set by Ofqual and are the same across all AS and A-level Sociology specifications and all exam boards.

The exams will measure how students have achieved the following assessment objectives.

  • AO1: Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of:
    • sociological theories, concepts and evidence
    • sociological research methods
  • AO2: Apply sociological theories, concepts, evidence and research methods to a range of issues
  • AO3: Analyse and evaluate sociological theories, concepts, evidence and research methods in order to:
    • present arguments
    • make judgements
    • draw conclusions.

Pupils are expected within each year group to submit assessed essays on a fortnightly basis which tracks and monitors progress. This is designed to help practise exam style questions.

Pupils are given mock exam throughout the year to help achieve target grades. Mocks are assessed in both January and May for both Year 12 and Year 13.

Religious Education

Religious Education

All pupils and students at Hagley Catholic High School follow a taught course of Religious Education. The Department is made up by five full-time specialist teachers who are fully committed to both RE and the Catholic Life of the school:

  • Mrs C Cotterill, Subject leader, RE This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

  • Mr P Farley, Teacher in charge of Character & Culture and Post 16 General RE This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

  • Mrs A Griffiths, Teacher of RE This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

  • Mr A Sommerville, Teacher of RE This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

  • Mrs E Castle, Teacher of RE, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

Vision

The aims of religious education are set out by the Bishop’s Council and shared by the staff and Academy committee of Hagley Catholic High School:

  1. To present engagingly a comprehensive content which is the basis of knowledge 1 and understanding of the Catholic faith;
  2. To enable pupils continually to deepen their religious and theological understanding and be able to communicate this effectively;
  3. To present an authentic vision of the Church’s moral and social teaching so that pupils can make a critique of the underlying trends in contemporary culture and society;
  4. To raise pupils’ awareness of the faith and traditions of other religious communities in order to respect and understand them;
  5. To develop the critical faculties of pupils so that they can relate their Catholic faith to daily life;
  6. To stimulate pupils’ imagination and provoke a desire for personal meaning as revealed in the truth of the Catholic faith;
  7. To enable pupils to relate the knowledge gained through Religious Education to their understanding of other subjects in the curriculum;
  8. To bring clarity to the relationship between faith and life, and between faith and culture.

The outcome of excellent Religious Education is religiously literate and engaged young people who have the knowledge, understanding and skills – appropriate to their age and capacity – to reflect spiritually, and think ethically and theologically, and who are aware of the demands of religious commitment in everyday life.

Throughout their time at Hagley Catholic school student follow the Catholic Curriculum Directory with topics in KS3 providing the foundation for KS4 and KS5. Students develop explanation, interpretation, and analytical skills throughout their study and the ability to construct and defend their views in light of Church Teachings.   

Year 7

  • Belonging and Identity
  • Jesus the Messiah
  • Worship
  • Sacraments
  • Pilgrim Church
  • Islam

Year 7 students develop a proficient use of Bibles to help them support their writing. They also focus on the acquisition of key vocabulary, the formation of descriptive writing and reference to religious teachings and beliefs.

Please see our Knowledge Organizers for Year 7 below:

Year 8

  • Creation
  • Covenant
  • Church in Britain
  • Paschal Mystery
  • Sikhism

Please see our Knowledge Organizers for Year 8 below:

Year 8 students develop links between belief and actions in person’s life. They also focus on the making links between scripture and the way in which a religious person thinks and acts. Students develop evaluative writing using religious teachings and beliefs to reinforce their arguments.

Year 9

  • God's Call
  • The Gospels
  • Spiritual Quest
  •  Holy Spirit
  • Morality and Conscience

Year 9 students develop links between Church teachings and the lived reality of Catholics. They also focus on using scripture and sources of authority as the basis for their writing. Students develop the skills needed to respond to GCSE question styles. .

In line with whole-school policy, pupils will be set weekly homework. This is primarily to use, learn and self quiz the information contained in the Knowledge Organisers and complete checking activities. Alternative activities will be set as required to assist and develop skills. 

Please see our Knowledge Organizers for Year 9 below:

Year 10

All pupils follow AQA's Specification B GCSE in Religious Studies, building on the skills developed in KS3. The qualification comprises of three units, which are all assessed entirely by examination at the end of Year 11:

  1. Catholic Christianity (50%)
  2. Judaism (25%)
  3. Ethical Themes (25%)

In year 10 students complete units on:

  • Incarnation
  • Triune God
  • Redemption
  • Church & the Kingdom of God
  • Relationships

Revision material for each of the units can be found below; additional revision is provided by the Department in the terms preceding the exams. Further information, available directly from AQA, may be found by clicking here.

The curriculum fulfils the requirements of the 2012 Religious Education Curriculum Directory for Catholic Schools & Colleges in England & Wales, published by the Catholic Bishops' Conference of England.

Year 11

All pupils follow AQA's Specification B GCSE in Religious Studies, building on the skills developed in KS3. The qualification comprises of three units, which are all assessed entirely by examination at the end of Year 11:

  1. Catholic Christianity (50%)
  2. Judaism (25%)
  3. Ethical Themes (25%)

In year 11 students complete units on:

  • Eschatology
  • Judaism: Beliefs
  • Judaism: Practises 
  • Review and revision of learning

Revision material for each of the units can be found below; additional revision is provided by the Department in the terms preceding the exams. Further information, available directly from AQA, may be found by clicking here.

The curriculum fulfils the requirements of the 2012 Religious Education Curriculum Directory for Catholic Schools & Colleges in England & Wales, published by the Catholic Bishops' Conference of England.

 

Key Stage 5

Religious Studies, at A-level, is all about exploring scholarly and philosophical debates surrounding the Philosophy of Religion, Ethical theories and the New Testament.The course is made up of three units; Philosophy, Ethics & New Testament.

Religious Studies demands hard work and is regarded as an academic discipline. An active and enquiring mind is important as well as the willingness to debate and discuss controversial issues that arise. Essays and on-line discussions will be set on a regular basis.

Excellent pass rate at A-level. The RE Department has a highly qualified team of specialists with a proven track record of preparing students for public examination.

Theology is highly regarded by universities as an academic subject, encompassing many fields, including Philosophy, Ethics, Old Testament/New Testament Studies, World Religions, Church History and Liberation Theology. The critical skills acquired during A-level Religious Studies provide an excellent foundation for entry into Social work, Journalism and Business/Managerial courses.

Theology and/or Philosophy have been the chosen degree subject(s) of several students in recent years, at Cardiff, Leeds Trinity, Bishop Grosseteste, York St John and Newman.

In recent years, a number of our past students have become Youth Leaders in Catholic Youth Renewal Centres.

Useful Links

 

Assessment

  • In KS3 and KS4 GCSE style Question 5s are used as formative mid unit assessments, with a full question 1-5 GCSE set of questions at the end of each unit as summative assessments.
  • During lessons students use exam style questions to test and develop their learning.
  • End of year exams at for KS3 and Mock exams for KS4 are completed in the school gym, under formal exam conditions.
  • In KS5, a range of past questions are used in each component of study to assess knowledge and skill each half term. Mock exams are completed each year in formal conditions.

Extra-Curricular

Year 7 & Year 8 – Residential retreat at ‘The Briars’

Year 10 & Year 11 - Pilgrimages to Rome and Auschwitz in Poland take place on alternate years. KS4 students have the opportunity to attend both, if they wish, over the course of their GCSE study.

Year 12 – Pilgrimage to Lourdes, with related skill acquisition and charitable activities